Send your project viral with the help of the UK’s leading English audio and video translation company.

Video content is King

If a picture tells a thousand words, can you imagine what a video can do? Just look at the way social media is progressing, with the likes of YouTube, Vimeo, Snapchat and Vine; we are certainly the video generation, and so are your customers.

Let us help you reach new markets and promote your content, with our expertise in re-versioning your audio and video content. You will get an all-inclusive, cost-effective and hassle-free video translation solution. From transcribing, translating a video and voicing it over, to creating English subtitles and graphically editing captions or on-screen text for a foreign language version of your video – we can do it all!

Impress your customers with a English version of your audio or video content, including business presentations, corporate and educational videos, e-learning courses, feature films, promo videos and many more.

GoLocalise adhere to rigorous quality assurance processes to monitor quality and precision throughout every stage of a translation project.

You won’t need to worry about the technical side or whether your product meets industry standards. Our experienced project managers are all trained in voice over and subtitling and are well aware of the requirements and constraints involved. We work with industry-standard subtitling software to thoroughly check all subtitle files before delivery, to ensure you get the highest quality possible.

We have more than 15 years' experience in the localisation field, so you are in safe hands. You can rest assured and trust us to deliver an accurately timed and perfectly translated English version of your script, audio or video content!

Whether you are a corporate client or a translation or production company, we will adapt to your needs so that you can add video or audio translation services to your portfolio of services.

We are only a call or email away or, if you prefer, visit our get-a-quote page to discuss your video or audio project in detail. You will receive a English version of your video or audio file adapted to your project specifications and needs, and best of all, it will WOW your customers.

GoLocalise are a joy to work with. Nothing is too much trouble for them and we always appreciate their good advice, flexibility, fairness and professionalism. I would highly recommend them for any project.

Stefanie Smith Producer at Education First

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Create high impact, first time
with golocalise as your audio and video translation service provider

  • WOW your clients with first-class translations carried out by translation experts in that particular industry sector.
  • Stringent quality control processes - subtitling (English) templates created and checked in-house, and timed to professional standards.
  • Industry leading subtitling software to create subtitles that are perfectly timed to the exact frame and aesthetically positioned around shot changes.
  • Your message faithfully and accurately delivered by experienced native subtitlers only.
  • All translations are thoroughly quality checked by our experienced project managers before final delivery.
  • You will receive ready-to-use videos with translated burnt-in subtitles - open captions - that are ready to be uploaded to your website. You can customise the style and look of the subtitles (font, size, colour, positioning, etc.).
  • If you prefer to give your clients or viewers flexibility, why not go for subtitles that can be switched on and off in multiple languages? You can receive closed captions in the format of your choice – ready to be uploaded to YouTube or Vimeo channels, DVD or Blu-Ray.
  • Go the extra mile by localising all your content. On-screen text and captions in your video can be translated and graphically edited, so that you receive a flawless foreign language version.

LOOKING FOR A DIFFERENT LANGUAGE?

WHY CHOOSE US?

ISO 9001 Certified ISO 14001 Certified

You deserve the best! Leave your project to the experts at GoLocalise so that you can relax and be assured of getting top-notch results.

Every single detail will be analysed, studied and looked after so that you do not need to worry. Some would say it’s not too classy to blow our own trumpet… but we just like to point out two very important details.

We have achieved ISO 9001 Quality Management certification in recognition of our consistent performance and high standards, and ISO 14001 Environmental Management because we care about our planet!

And if you are still curious and want to know more about us, why not have a look at our Team or Awards pages.

Types of
Transcription

GoLocalise offers transcription services for audio and video files in over 100 languages including English. Our expert team of transcribers will create a text version of your video or audio file, and we can also translate and/or voice over your transcript.

There are different variations of this service, all of which will result in a text document containing the dialogue from the source audio or video file:

1Verbatim transcriptions

This will include absolutely everything that is part of the footage, such as “ums, uhs”, false starts, noise words, any sounds, etc. The transcriber will also leave the speech as it is, even in the case of incorrect phrase or language selection, colloquialisms and poor grammar.

2WORD-FOR-WORD TRANSCRIPTIONS

This type of transcription will only include the speech, but the transcriber will leave out any redundant or unnecessary elements such as nervous stutters, false starts, etc. The speech will however stay the same and will not be edited.

3GENERAL TRANSCRIPTIONS

With this type of transcription, the style will be “written” more than “spoken”. Any grammar or syntax errors will be corrected in the process, and the text will read well and be grammatically correct.

We specialise in transcriptions that will be used as voice over scripts, (on-screen) captions and subtitles. Our experience in these fields has made us the top choice for clients all over the world who want to re-version their existing audiovisual content into several different language versions.

Transcriptions can be used for different purposes – as a script for a voice over session, or as reference when editing raw footage for example. We can also produce a time-coded and condensed version of the transcription that can be used for subtitling purposes.

No matter if your content is in English or any other language, we can help!

Caption and graphic
Editing

When localising and translating videos (whether you choose subtitling or voice over), you’ll find that often there are several elements that need to be localised. These elements can be on-screen graphics, text and/or captions.

Our expert project managers will review the video or project file and advise which elements would be best subtitled or graphically edited. If you do not have the project files, worry not; one of our expert editors will be able to re-create the graphics, captions and titles of your video.

Our expert editors work with a multitude of software: to localise graphics we use Photoshop or Illustrator; and After Effects and Final Cut Pro to create motion graphics and visual effects.

Once all elements are in the video, and the graphic elements have been created and localised, we can then rebuild the video and export it to whichever format and codec you need. We’ll prepare your video project for any platform, including PAL, NTSC, VOD, the Internet, smartphones, game consoles, mp3 players and tablets.

With our facilities and highly skilled operators, your videos are in safe hands!

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3 steps to high
Quality Assurance

We use continuous quality control processes to monitor quality and accuracy at each and every stage of a translation project.

Hand-picked translators

Translators are screened not only for linguistic ability but also for technical knowledge. Applicants must pass interviews and rigorous subject-specific language tests. Furthermore all our translators have at least five years experience in their sector.

EDITING

Each translated document is edited by a second translator to ensure accuracy and to address any linguistic issues. Again, the work is assigned to a specialist according to subject matter.

REVISION

At GoLocalise, the translation process goes one step further with a final quality assurance step. A third translator revises the document to verify that editing changes and formatting have been properly implemented, and that there are no omissions or typographical errors. Every translation is checked word for word against the original and any changes that are required are made to ensure that the correct terminology is used consistently throughout the text.

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A translation
Masterclass

At GoLocalise nothing is too much hassle! The expert team of project managers, translators and linguists are always at hand to ensure your content is perfectly localised – whatever the media. You’ll benefit from a company with over 15 years' experience, an in-house subtitling team, and in-house state-of-the-art recording facilities!

Audiovisual Translation

Audiovisual translation, or AVT, is a highly specialised type of translation, which is increasingly popular in today’s digital world. We are surrounded by audiovisual content, so it makes sense that there is a type of translation that is suitable for the modern technological world.

AVT requires some of the same skills as general translation but also poses additional challenges. In subtitling for instance, the translator must fit the translation into the time and space constraints posed by the video; whilst in voice over the length of the translation must be considered and match the original as closely as possible. And these are just a few examples.

AVT is certainly no easy task and it takes a team of experienced professionals to do it well. This is where we can help you. We are highly specialised in AVT, so you can trust us to deliver products which look good, sound great and are perfectly suited to your target audience, all in your preferred format.

Video Game Translation

We know that a game doesn’t just have to look good and play smoothly, it also has to sound great and read well too. That’s why we, at GoLocalise, provide all our clients with carefully selected linguists, who are not only specialists in the video game field but are also gamers themselves.

We look after every single detail when localising games into foreign languages and always use the latest glossaries for all the current video game platforms, Wii, PlayStation, Xbox, etc. so that terminology and platform word choices are always spot-on.

E-learning Translation

GoLocalise provides your company with e-learning translation, localisation and voice over services, leaving you with a ready-to-host product.

We only employ highly skilled linguists who have extensive experience in e-learning and a sound understanding of the particular industry sector they are dealing with.

Our service includes the management of the whole process and the delivery of content adapted to foreign markets.

The steps and services involved in any end-to-end e-learning project are: the translation of the course and on-screen text; the localisation of the course graphics; the voice over recording of the course with your preferred voice over talent/s; and the quality control during which the localised course files are reviewed against the original files.

A BRIEF HISTORY OF English

British English is the English language as spoken and written in Great Britain or, more broadly, throughout the British Isles. Slight regional variations exist in formal, written English in the United Kingdom. For example, the adjective wee is almost exclusively used in parts of Scotland and Northern Ireland, whereas little is predominant elsewhere. Nevertheless, there is a meaningful degree of uniformity in written English within the United Kingdom, and this could be described by the term British English. The forms of spoken English, however, vary considerably more than in most other areas of the world where English is spoken, so a uniform concept of British English is more difficult to apply to the spoken language. According to Tom McArthur in the Oxford Guide to World English, British English shares “all the ambiguities and tensions in the word British and as a result can be used and interpreted in two ways, more broadly or more narrowly, within a range of blurring and ambiguity.”

When distinguished from American English, the term “British English” is sometimes used broadly as a synonym for “Commonwealth English”, the general dialect of English spoken amongst the former British colonies exclusive of the particular regionalisms of, for example, Australian or Canadian English.

English is a West Germanic language that originated from the Anglo-Frisian dialects brought to Britain by Germanic settlers from various parts of what is now northwest Germany and the northern Netherlands. The resident population at this time was generally speaking Common Brittonic—the insular variety of continental Celtic, which was influenced by the Roman occupation. This group of languages (Welsh, Cornish, Cumbric) cohabited alongside English into the modern period, but due to their remoteness from the Germanic languages, influence on English was notably limited. However, the degree of influence remains debated, and it has recently been argued that its grammatical influence accounts for the substantial innovations noted between English and the other West Germanic languages. Initially, Old English was a diverse group of dialects, reflecting the varied origins of the Anglo-Saxon Kingdoms of England. One of these dialects, Late West Saxon, eventually came to dominate. The original Old English language was then influenced by two waves of invasion: the first was by speakers of the Scandinavian branch of the Germanic family, who conquered and colonised parts of Britain in the 8th and 9th centuries; the second was the Normans in the 11th century, who spoke Old Norman and ultimately developed an English variety of this called Anglo-Norman. These two invasions caused English to become “mixed” to some degree (though it was never a truly mixed language in the strictest sense of the word; mixed languages arise from the cohabitation of speakers of different languages, who develop a hybrid tongue for basic communication).

The more idiomatic, concrete and descriptive English is, the more it is from Anglo-Saxon origins. The more intellectual and abstract English is, the more it contains Latin and French influences (e.g. pig is the animal bred by the occupied Anglo-Saxons and pork is the animal eaten by the occupying Normans). Cohabitation with the Scandinavians resulted in a significant grammatical simplification and lexical enrichment of the Anglo-Frisian core of English; the later Norman occupation led to the grafting onto that Germanic core of a more elaborate layer of words from the Romance branch of the European languages. This Norman influence entered English largely through the courts and government. Thus, English developed into a “borrowing” language of great flexibility and with a huge vocabulary.

The major divisions are normally classified as English English (or English as spoken in England, which encompasses Southern English dialects, West Country dialects, East and West Midlands English dialects and Northern English dialects), Welsh English (not to be confused with the Welsh language), Irish English and Scottish English (not to be confused with the Scots language). The various British dialects also differ in the words that they have borrowed from other languages. Following its last major survey of English Dialects (1949–1950), the University of Leeds has started work on a new project. In May 2007 the Arts and Humanities Research Council awarded a grant to a team led by Sally Johnson, Professor of Linguistics and Phonetics at Leeds University, to study British regional dialects.

Johnson’s team are[a] sifting through a large collection of examples of regional slang words and phrases turned up by the “Voices project” run by the BBC, in which they invited the public to send in examples of English still spoken throughout the country. The BBC Voices project also collected hundreds of news articles about how the British speak English from swearing through to items on language schools. This information will also be collated and analysed by Johnson’s team both for content and for where it was reported. “Perhaps the most remarkable finding in the Voices study is that the English language is as diverse as ever, despite our increased mobility and constant exposure to other accents and dialects through TV and radio. Work by the team on this project is not expected to end before 2010.

The form of English most commonly associated with the upper class in the southern counties of England is called Received Pronunciation (RP). It derives from a mixture of the Midland and Southern dialects spoken in London in the early modern period and is frequently used as a model for teaching English to foreign learners. Although speakers from elsewhere in England may not speak with an RP accent, it is now a class dialect more than a local dialect. It may also be referred to as “the Queen’s (or King’s) English”, “Public School English”, “Posh” or “BBC English” as this was originally the form of English used on radio and television, although a wider variety of accents can be heard these days. About 2% of Britons speak RP,[10] and it has evolved quite markedly over the last 40 years.

In the South East there are significantly different accents; the Cockney accent spoken by some East Londoners is strikingly different from RP. The Cockney rhyming slang can be (and was initially intended to be) difficult for outsiders to understand, although the extent of its use is often somewhat exaggerated.

Estuary English has been gaining prominence in recent decades: it has some features of RP and some of Cockney. In London itself, the broad local accent is still changing, partly influenced by Caribbean speech. Immigrants to the UK in recent decades have brought many more languages to the country. Surveys started in 1979 by the Inner London Education Authority discovered over 100 languages being spoken domestically by the families of the inner city’s schoolchildren. As a result, Londoners speak with a mixture of accents, depending on ethnicity, neighbourhood, class, age, upbringing, and sundry other factors.

Since the mass internal immigration to Northamptonshire in the 1940s and its position between several major accent regions, it has become a source of various accent developments. In Northampton the older accent has been influenced by overspill Londoners. There is an accent known locally as the Kettering accent, which is a transitional accent between the East Midlands and East Anglian. It is the last southern midland accent to use the broad “a” in words like bath/grass (i.e. barth/grarss). Conversely crass/plastic use a slender “a”. A few miles northwest in Leicestershire the slender “a” becomes more widespread generally. In the town of Corby, five miles (8 km) north, one can find Corbyite, which unlike the Kettering accent, is largely influenced by the West Scottish accent. In addition, most British people can to some degree temporarily “swing” their accent towards a more neutral form of English at will, to reduce difficulty where very different accents are involved, or when speaking to foreigners.

As with English around the world, the English language as used in the United Kingdom is governed by convention rather than formal code: there is no body equivalent to the Académie française or the Real Academia Española. Dictionaries (for example, Oxford English Dictionary, Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English, Chambers Dictionary, Collins Dictionary) record usage rather than attempting to prescribe it. In addition, vocabulary and usage change with time: words are freely borrowed from other languages and other strains of English, and neologisms are frequent.

For historical reasons dating back to the rise of London in the 9th century, the form of language spoken in London and the East Midlands became standard English within the Court, and ultimately became the basis for generally accepted use in the law, government, literature and education in Britain. To a considerable extent, modern British spelling was standardised in Samuel Johnson’s A Dictionary of the English Language (1755), although previous writers had also played a significant role in this and much has changed since 1755. Scotland, which underwent parliamentary union with England only in 1707, still has a few independent standards, especially within its separate legal system.

Since the early 20th century, British authors have produced numerous books intended as guides to English grammar and usage, a few of which have achieved sufficient acclaim to have remained in print for long periods and to have been reissued in new editions after some decades. These include, most notably of all, Fowler’s Modern English Usage and The Complete Plain Words by Sir Ernest Gowers. Detailed guidance on many aspects of writing British English for publication is included in style guides issued by various publishers including The Times newspaper, the Oxford University Press and the Cambridge University Press. The Oxford University Press guidelines were originally drafted as a single broadsheet page by Horace Henry Hart, and were at the time (1893) the first guide of their type in English; they were gradually expanded and eventually published, first as Hart’s Rules, and in 2002 as part of The Oxford Manual of Style. Comparable in authority and stature to The Chicago Manual of Style for published American English, the Oxford Manual is a fairly exhaustive standard for published British English that writers can turn to in the absence of specific guidance from their publishing house.

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GET STARTED WITH
A English TRANSLATION

THE COMPLETE
SOLUTION

Looking for more than just a voice over? You can also get high quality subtitling and translation services from us too.

Subtitling

  • Experienced and Passionate Subtitlers
  • Industry-Standard Subtitling Software
  • Subtitle Burn-in Graphic Editing
  • Open/Close Caption, DVD, Blu-ray & Web
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Voice Over

  • State-of-the-art Recording Studios
  • Neumann Microphones
  • On-hand Sound Engineers
  • Talented Voice Over Actors
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